Caring for Our Childen (CFOC)

Chapter 3: Health Promotion and Protection

3.2 Hygiene

3.2.3 Exposure to Body Fluids

3.2.3.3: Cuts and Scrapes


Cuts or sores that are actively dripping, oozing, or draining body fluids should be covered with a dressing to avoid contamination of surfaces in child care. The caregiver/teacher should wear gloves if there is contact with any wound (cut or scrape) that has material that could be transmitted to another surface.

A child or caregiver/teacher with a cut or sore that is leaking a body fluid that cannot be contained or cannot be covered with a dressing, should be excluded from the facility until the cut or sore is scabbed over or healed.

RATIONALE
Touching a contaminated object or surface may spread infectious organisms (1,2). Body fluids may contain infectious organisms (1,2).

Gloves can provide a protective barrier against infectious organisms that may be present in body fluids (1,2).

COMMENTS
Covering sores on lips and on eyes is difficult. Children or caregivers/teachers who are unable to prevent contact with these exposed lesions should be excluded until lesions do not present a risk of transmission of a pathogen.
TYPE OF FACILITY
Center, Early Head Start, Head Start, Large Family Child Care Home, Small Family Child Care Home
RELATED STANDARDS
1.4.2.3 Orientation Topics
3.2.3.4 Prevention of Exposure to Blood and Body Fluids
3.6.1.1 Inclusion/Exclusion/Dismissal of Children
5.6.0.1 First Aid and Emergency Supplies
Appendix D: Gloving
REFERENCES
  1. Aronson, S. S., T. R. Shope, eds. 2017. Managing infectious diseases in child care and schools: A quick reference guide, pp. 43-48. 4th Edition. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics.
  2. American Academy of Pediatrics. Out-of-home child care, infection control and prevention In: Kimberlin DW, Brady MT, Jackson MA, Long SS, eds. Red Book: 2018 Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases. 31st Edition. Itasca, IL:  American Academy of Pediatrics; 2018: 125-136, 122-125, 124t